Category: Azalea & Rhododendron

Best Azalea Mulch – Bark

Azaleas and rhododendrons have shallow roots, and can suffer badly in dry weather: a good moisture-retentive mulch is therefore vital. Peat is an obvious choice for such acid-loving plants, but only so long as it’s wet. When it dries out,…

Azalea Propagation

There are two main ways, as there are with most plants – by seed and by cuttings. RaisĀ­ing azaleas from seed is a lengthy business and, unless you are interested in hybridising them, worthwhile only with the few true species.…

Difference between Azalea and Rhododendrons

The plants we call azaleas and rhododenĀ­drons all belong to the Ericaceae family, as do heathers and the strawberry tree. Most of them prefer acid soils. At one time, azaleas were treated as a distinct genus, but they are now.…

Deadheading Azalea

By removing dead flowers -and the immature seed pods they contain -you encourage the plant to direct its energy into building up strength for the following year rather than into producing seeds, which is what it would do in the…

Christmas azelea – planting in garden

Christmas azaleas are forced dwarf azaleas and hybrids derived mainly from two small Asian species. They do well in a cool greenhouse, but could be planted permanently outdoors only in the very mildest winter areas. Image Credit: Flickr Still the…

Azalea gall:white blobs on shoots

If azaleas have developed small, white cheesy blobs on the shoots or leaves, this is azalea gall, a common disease of both deciduous and evergreen species. The tender indoor varieties are particularly prone to it, especially when they are grown…

Azalea: Notches on leaves – Weevils

If your azaleas have little notches extending inwards from the leaf edges the notches are caused by the vine weevil, a small, flightless, long-nosed beetle which attacks many types of garden plant. A menace in both its larval and adult…