Category: Vegetables A-Z

Growing peas and beans: legumes

Peas and beans come under legumes for crop rotation. They need plenty of organic matter dug in to keep their roots moist. Taller varieties of peas and beans are not suitable for deep dug beds as the soil is unlikely…

Growing loose leaf lettuce

Sometimes called chicken lettuce, these varieties are not harvested whole, nor do they form a heart like cabbage and cos lettuces, but individual leaves are picked as required. This cut—and—come again approach is useful as it allows space to be…

Growing crisphead lettuce

The leaves of crisphead lettuce are large, curled and, as the name suggests, pleasantly crunchy. The old favourite Webb’s Wonferful, withstands heat and drought better than most. How to grow crisphead lettuce Lettuces need light, moisture-retentive soil, For till protected…

Growing cos lettuce

The leaves of cos lettuce are long and crisp, with a sweeter flavour than cabbage types. Since the plants take longer to reach maturity, they take up space in the vegetable garden for an extended period. In smaller gardens, a…

growing cucumbers in greenhouse

Greenhouse cucumbers need careful attention but as few as two plants can be very productive. How to grow cucumbers – Three weeks before planting, prepare a special cucumber bed on the greenhouse floor, using a mixture of 2 parts well-rotted…

Growing Ridge Cucumber

If you do not have a heated greenhouse and live in a cooler climate, you can still grow cucumbers if you choose the small variety that can be eaten in salads or pickled. How to grow ridge cucumber Dig the…

Growing Butterhead lettuce

Of all the varieties of lettuce available, this cabbage lettuce is the most popular. The name butterhead refers to the ‘buttery’ texture of the smooth, flattened leaves in named varieties such as Suzan and Fortune. How to grow butterhead lettuce…

Storing Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers

The knobbly jerusalem artichoke tubers quickly lose water when they’ve been dug up, and even when put in a polythene bag at the bottom of a refriger­ator will keep firm for only up to three weeks. The best thing is…

Using Artichokes as wind screen

Growing an ornamental sunflower-like screen around vegetable patch that yields masses of edible tubers sounds great – but there are many problems with it. The stems will not make an effective screen until June, and they could easily exceed an…

Difference between Globe and Jerusalem Artichokes

They are both perennial vegetables, but that’s about all they have in common. The Jerusalem artichoke is completely hardy, and spring-planted tubers can give a tenfold increase by the following autumn. The name is nothing to do with the Holy…